Monthly: September 2013

Bill Nichols

6 September 2013

Bill Nichols

Telling Tales:  The PR Narrative Revenue Opportunity   

009 – September 2013

‘Narrative, narrative, PR narrative’ everywhere.  It’s a staple of consultancy creds.  Every PR campaign and every brand, apparently, should have one.

But how exactly do you sell it?  Make money? And, as a client, what are you buying?

Cynics say 20 years of narrative chat is just consultant re-packaging – backstories and news agendas remixed.  A case of: ‘the sun shone down, having no alternative, on the nothing new’ – to quote a favourite narrative opening!  (‘A’)

Maybe.  But my own research review is surprisingly positive. It comes with two caveats.  That: (1) PR folks really are the great storytellers; and (2) PR consultancy management teams really want to exit their traditional comfort zone and exploit their intellectual assets (e.g. storytelling).

So what are the prospects?  This little narrative is a ‘will-they-do-it?   And like ‘whodunnits’, we need means, motive and first…

Opportunity Knocks

No question, storytelling is fundamental to effective PR.   It’s the ultimate human way to learn and persuade. But, as content consumption fragments across multiple formats and platforms, it’s ever more challenging.  So, agencies that deliver a clearly-defined service offering in this environment should command premium fees.

And those fees are likely dwarfed by the wider marketing opportunity.  Especially the bridge from research.   From NPD and market planning to brand personality, the skilled storyteller is in demand.

Here’s why. Today serious marketers get much input from advanced quant analytics.  It’s marvellous, necessary but insufficient.  By definition, quant analytics structures, reduces and limits – often using predetermined models.  However detailed, for example, a segmentation grid lacks intimacy. To paraphrase: analytics quantifies everything but teaches the human value of very little.   This is – popularly – red-light thinking (‘B’).

So marketers want more.  To capture, and apply, active market learning.  To be inside the room.  Watching, listening and participating.  They want the human stories.  Stories with time-lines which are granular and richly revealing.  Stories, not least, which are suffused with an emotional texture as we hear, see and feel what actually matters (‘C’).

This is the province of  the storyteller (PR as bridge or translator).  As the philosopher-linguist, Roland Barthes wrote:  “narrative does not show, does not imitate…. (It is) a higher order of relation which has its emotions, its hopes, its dangers, its triumphs.” (D).

Why and How – Motive and Means

Sounds like fun?  But there’s far more motive than good fees.   For PR storytellers, this is a way up the food-chain to that mystical top table.  Buyers want new thinking and possibilities for innovation.  Per Coca Cola VP, Stan Sthanunathan, they want: ‘inspiration and provocation’ .  (http://www.slideshare.net/TheARF/research-must-change-11257698).  In short, they want the green-light stuff.  Real value-added.

Now, you’re thinking, the tough part: the means.   Can PR deliver?

Relax.  If you really want to get into narrative, there are endless options for classy models and frameworks.  You’ll be on solid ground, centuries old.  Up there with the old pros like lawyers and doctors.  There’s literary theory, narratology, linguistics and one more…

Ethnography (out of anthropology) is one of the oldest research forms.  It’s about immersion (‘ethno-dunking’ as some practitioners delightfully call it).  It’s become a major tool for blue-chip market research teams from Xerox and Wells Fargo to Procter & Gamble.

And ethnographic storytelling has emerged a major way of transforming viewpoints and disrupting old modes of thinking (C).

And not just for marketers.   It is, researchers suggest, capable of driving a new ‘storytelling organisation’.

What About PR?

So a massive opportunity for in-house and agency teams alike; strong motive; and really powerful means.    But ‘will-they-do-it?’ Will they embrace ‘PR narrative’?

Mmm.  Would love to see it.  But the PR industry seems to hesitate when offered the chance to move off home base.  Fear? Lack of confidence?  Purism?

Watch this space. Another chapter? Maybe…

(A)  Beckett, S, Murphy (1938); (B) Green A, Creativity in PR (2010); (C) Cayla, J and Arnould E, Journal of Marketing (2013, No.4 – July); (D) Barthes, R, Image, Music, Text (1977).